What Did She Say?

Hello Friends! Tonight’s feature image is of Fayette County as seen from Nicholas County West Virginia. The image is titled “First Winter1” because it was the winter photo that ever took with a serious camera. If you would like to purchase a copy please see the instructions at the bottom of the page.

I woke up this morning with a cold chill running down my spine and stared blankly at the ceiling. Yesterday’s story played out over and over again in my head. It has finally happened… I was wrong. How could I ever face the day? Well. Actually it’s pretty easy. All humour aside I do need to straighten out an inaccurate statement from my last post. The ” 4 days until Spring statement. The funny thing is that I knew better. Yes Spring is close but it’s still about a month or so away. The first “official day of Spring is March 20th. Not March 1st. So how did it happen? I was able to locate a term for what happened but there should be one. I committed a basic internet rookie error. I trusted the answer provided by the Google Assistant without using a common sense filter. In my defense let me provide exhibit 1. A screen shot of Google’s misleading answer.

Now honestly I knew better and I got caught up in confirmation bias. You see, I wanted the answer that I got and turned a blind eye to the accuracy of the search results. Which brings me to the main point of tonight’s post. How much should we trust technology? In the age of instant knowledge can we be so quick to abandon objectivity? Well, last night’s post is an example of why we need to be vigilant about checking the source of information. For me the result was some minor embarrassment and looking silly. Y’know what? That happens to everyone for one reason or another and it happens more often than most people care to admit. There’s no real harm done. But what if I had been researching something more serious like first aid or how to make an emergency vehicle repair? The list can go on but the point is that the answer you want to be hear may not be the right answer. As for last night’s post I did update the word “calendar” in the second sentence to the word “Google” and added an update to bottom of the article for the purpose of honesty. And, while the countdown to Spring is a little longer than 3 to 4 days it’s not as long as it was when the days were shorter and the nights were colder.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

If you would like to Follow me on Facebook the web address is

https://www.facebook.com/aviewfromthelens/

If you’re enjoying my blog and don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Click the web to go tohttps://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Did you know that I also do portraits by appointment? If you’re interested in a portrait session either message me on Facebook or use the Contact Form on my website

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I have new way for you purchase photos!

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply message me on Facebook or use the contact form on my website and tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you to https://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251

Lastly, all of the photos are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographer.

Thank you again for your support of my page! 😊

Remembering Wintertime Camping

If you are interested in a copy of tonight’s feature image purchase instructions are at the bottom of the article. 😊

The big chill of 2019 in full swing tonight. I look out my window at the crystalline world that surrounds me and thank God for my warm home with it’s gas heat. I thank God for the modern conveniences and the large bed with a deep pile of blankets. I haven’t participated in deer camp for several years but I do have memories camping in the winter climate. It wasn’t as cold as is this year but there was more than one occasion when the temperature was down in the teens at night. I remember one night in particular, when I was out with an ROTC group that we dug ditches to sleep in. Because we got down below the frost line we didn’t freeze. Being out in the extreme cold is certainly an experience that will test your will. It’s not something that I recommend unless you are well prepared and you’re only a few feet away from a warm shelter. Aside from sleeping in a ditch I would try to get out of wind by trying to find a spot that’s high enough up out of valleys that the cold air doesn’t settle down on top of my camp but not so high that the mountain doesn’t buffer the wind. Finding thick fir trees is also a good place to get out of wind.

I’m sure that you’ve seen the memes that advises people that “if you’re cold they’re cold” that raises awareness about pet safety in cold weather. Pets are family too and as such they’re adapted to live in the conditions we live in. Which means a warm fire and good shelter. But what if the rolls were reversed? What if we were suddenly thrust into wild on a cold night? Well, we’d need to adapt ourselves to do what the wildlife does to survive.

1. Community. Herd and pack animals rely on each other to keep warm. They keep the young near the center in order to provide the most shelter.

2. Burrowing. Foxes, chipmunks and some birds escape from freezing cold by digging below the frost line like I mentioned earlier.

3. The den. Beavers and squirrels make nests of thick piles of brush to stay nice and cozy. There’s a right way and a wrong way to do this.

This kind of thing is a young person’s game. The older I get the less need I have to challenge myself. I’ll take a warm fire and cable television over a frozen landscape any day.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

Ring this bell for Facebook

Recently, I’ve been made aware that many of my posts on Facebook are being buried in the feed. So, if you don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website at the bottom of theWelcome Page

Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “Standing Against The Coldand is available forpurchase by using the Contact Form onmy website. ( justclick on the the bell below)

(Note, I do not share or sell contact information. EVER)

4X6 is $5.00

5X7 is $10.00

8X10 is $15.00

Some cropping may be necessary for certain sizes.

Ring this bell to order prints or schedule portraits

I’m also available for portraits by appointment. Use the Contact Form or message me on Facebook.

Snow Day!

The second polar blast of deep winter is just a few days away. It’s normal for us get a couple of these from late January to mid February and not uncommon for early March. As a kid I would always be excited to hear about a winter storm warning on the news because that meant the possibility of a snow day. Now, for some of my readers who live in warmer climates I understand that you may not fully appreciate the art of the the snow day. Have no fear, I will guide you through it. 😉

First, as soon as the morning alarm goes off you need to jump out of bed and run to the window. Do you see snow? If it’s snowing heavily then that’s a good sign but it’s not a snow day yet. Next run into the living room and turn on the news. In the old days the weatherman/girl would read the list of closed schools but today the list just scrolls across the screen or you get a notification on your app that school has been called off. Once you’ve confirmed that your school is on the list you’ll need to have a talk with mom and dad. Be mature, if they suspect that shenanigans are afoot you’re going to wind up with a babysitter. If you have access to a little brother or sister now’s the time to help them with breakfast. It’s important that mom and dad see you as capable of taking are of things. Once mom and dad have left the house in your capable hands you should spend the rest of the morning under you’re favorite blanket watching cartoons with your dog and younger sibling. Cartoons in the old days usually lasted until mid morning. In my case that’s about the time that a grandparent would make an appearance. If it was my Grandfather then there’s a chance that sleds will be hooked up to the tractor and the shenanigans are about to begin. More than likely he’s been out all morning preparing the sled run by packing the snow with the tractor tires or creating a path to pull us all over the farm. By lunchtime the ride is over and everyone goes inside for hot Cocoa and a toasted peanut butter sandwich. The rest of the day is spent alternating between sledding and cocoa until it’s time for mom and dad to come home again. Missing a day or two of school due to snow didn’t really make a difference in my education however an extra day with my Grandfather is an experience that enriched my whole life.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

Ring this bell for Facebook

Recently, I’ve been made aware that many of my posts on Facebook are being buried in the feed. So, if you don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website at the bottom of theWelcome Page

Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “ A Snow Day In Muddlty Creekand is available forpurchase by using the Contact Form onmy website. ( justclick on the the bell below)

(Note, I do not share or sell contact information. EVER)

4X6 is $5.00

5X7 is $10.00

8X10 is $15.00

Some cropping may be necessary for certain sizes.

Ring this bell to order prints or schedule portraits

I’m also available for portraits by appointment. Use the Contact Form or message me on Facebook.

Daydreams Of A Legend

About tonight’s feature image, this is the same clump of willow trees that I have been photographing in different seasons for almost a year. I processed several versions of the photos but decided that the blue of the selenium filter gave the best feeling of a cold winter day. The image title is simply “The Wading Willows In January“.

The spray from Kanawha Falls seems to freeze in the air on this cold January morning. The wading willows seem to be wandering out of the mists as if they are on their way back to shore. The scene takes on an otherworldly feel that’s right out of Tolkien’s Middle Earth. If not for the soft whine of the turbines belonging to the hydroelectric dam it would be easy to forget that Route 60 was just a few steps away. Still, I have to wonder if there’s a monster lurking in the icy depths below. Not some “Devil Fish” of folklore with tenticals such but a real world monster. Every body of water has a legendary fish that’s more than just the one that got away. In my area it’s usually a catfish that’s large enough to swallow a man whole that live at the base of dams and bridges. Occasionally someone sees a V shape in the water or spots one near the surface. I’ve met at least one person who showed me an expensive fishing pole designed for fishing the ocean surf that was snapped off at the base and the hook was pulled out straight. They say that when the water is up that the really big ones come looking for new hunting grounds around the stumps and logs that are inaccessible otherwise. It would be great to rig up a big fishing pole with just the right bait on a day like this. Perhaps I could build a small fire to keep warm and settle the monster catfish issue once and for all. However, the real world need to be on time for my day job pulls me away from the quest and the really big one gets away again.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

Ring this bell for Facebook

Recently, I’ve been made aware that many of my posts on Facebook are being buried in the feed. So, if you don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website at the bottom of theWelcome Page

Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “The Wading Willows In January and is available forpurchase by using the Contact Form onmy website. ( justclick on the the bell below)

(Note, I do not share or sell contact information. EVER)

4X6 is $5.00

5X7 is $10.00

8X10 is $15.00

Some cropping may be necessary for certain sizes.

Ring this bell to order prints or schedule portraits

I’m also available for portraits by appointment. Use the Contact Form or message me on Facebook.

January’s Crossings 2

Old man winter howls in rage. His icy breath blasts across the three rivers bringing the deep chill that always comes in the last half of January and early portions of February. As I walk up the track towards the perfect spot to get my shot I’m assailed with tiny bits of ice. Somewhere off to my left I can here the panicked call of a female cardinal. She can’t seem to find her mate and she’s very worried. Instinctively I glanced down towards the direction she’s calling just in time to see something bright red drop from a twig in the underbrush. My heart sinks because the river is up and the male has fallen close to the edge. But I can’t see where he landed. The female is really freaking out now and I began to look for a way down. It’s a myth that if you touch a bird that it’s mate will reject it. There was one other time about fifteen years ago when I scooped up a stunned make cardinal out of the street and sat it gently in a safer place. As soon as I stepped away his mate flew too his side until he felt like flying home. I saw them together many times afterwards. I began to head in the direction of the place where this one fell but after just a few steps he burst forth into the sky like a rocket and rejoined his forever beloved. When he appeared the female’s calls seemed to change from panic to cheering. As they sheltered together under the overhang of a roof it occurred to me that sometimes all you need to be strong is someone who believes in you. Once assured that all was well with the cardinals I returned to shot. The old trestle bridge stood there unshaken by old man winter’s morning tantrum. Perhaps it too merely needs someone to believe in its strength in order to stand against the storm.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

Ring this bell for Facebook

Recently, I’ve been made aware that many of my posts on Facebook are being buried in the feed. So, if you don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website at the bottom of theWelcome Page

Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “January’s Crossings 2and is available forpurchase by using the Contact Form onmy website. ( just click on the the bell below)

(Note, I do not share or sell contact information. EVER)

4X6 is $5.00

5X7 is $10.00

8X10 is $15.00

Some cropping may be necessary for certain sizes.

Ring this bell to order prints or schedule portraits

I’m also available for portraits by appointment. Use the Contact Form or message me on Facebook.

January’s Crossings 1

The winter winds whip across the three rivers as the steam rises up from my morning coffee. The wintery scene makes me feel like I’ve woken up inside if a snow globe. If not for the fact that I’m on my way to my day job I’d engage the four wheel drive and just idle my big blue truck through the Appalachian Mountains looking for magical places to just sit and watch the snow. The mists and snow seem to merge together as I begin to set up the shot making it look as if the other end of bridge disappears somewhere beyond the known world. For a moment I’m tempted to call off from the day job and allow my inner child to explore the frozen wilderness.

I know that if I travel beyond the bridge and up Gauley Mountain there will be frozen waterfalls with long icicles hanging from the painted sandstone cliffs. There will be little alcoves formed by snow covered bent trees that bright red cardinals play in. Across the forest floor squirrels bounce from tree trunk to tree trunk trying to remember where they stashed their acorns. It was just about that time that the real world recalled me from my daydreaming and I eased my big blue truck back onto the main road.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

Ring this bell for Facebook

Recently, I’ve been made aware that many of my posts on Facebook are being buried in the feed. So, if you don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website at the bottom of theWelcome Page

Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “January’s Crossings 1and is available forpurchase by using the Contact Form onmy website. ( just click on the the bell below)

(Note, I do not share or sell contact information. EVER)

4X6 is $5.00

5X7 is $10.00

8X10 is $15.00

Some cropping may be necessary for certain sizes.

Ring this bell to order prints or schedule portraits

I’m also available for portraits by appointment. Use the Contact Form or message me on Facebook.

Winter And Wild Teas

In the natural world winter is a time for rest. The animals tend to stay in their dens. The hardwood trees are in a deep sleep as are the bears. Even the deer find a nice place in the deep woods where they can shelter from the cold. The days are still short and the cold nights are long. Just perfect for deep rest.

The giant elm tree in tonight’s feature image is just as beautiful in the winter as it is with its leaves on in the warmer months. One of the special treats of the colder months when I was a kid was bark teas. I’d be careful about where I harvested the bark (see note below) but elm actually has a nice spicy flavor. Several years ago I was able to try it for the first time. Traditionally it’s used for sore throats and colds ( I’m not a doctor or a certified anything so this is historical statement and not medical advice) due to the gelatinous fiber it yields. The flavor is similar to the Balsam Poplar that grows in higher elevations. In just a few months the buds will begin to swell and they make a good tea as well. In the old days, the Basswood (Linden or Lyme in Europe) buds were a source of winter food for my ancestors. Winter hikes in my teens always included stopping by a grove of black birch for a handful of wintergreen flavored twigs to nibble on. Sassafras was also a wonderful bark tea with an aroma that filled the house. There’s also the Carolina Spicebush who’s twigs provide a very lemon like flavor and the red berries of the stag horn sumac which has to be filtered well but gives us a pink lemonade in winter.

Perhaps that’s why I like this big old elm tree so much. It’s not only because it’s awesome to look at but it reminds me of all the cool stuff that the Appalachian forests provide even in winter.

(NOTE: WHILE THE TREES AND FOOD USES MENTIONED IN TONIGHT’S POST WERE TRADITIONALLY USED IN APPALACHIA THERE ARE HAZARDS AND FOOD ALLERGIES TO CONSIDER. FOR EXAMPLE, THE ELM IN TONIGHT’S POST IS GROWING NEAR A PLACE WHERE HAZARDOUS SOIL CONTAMINATION IS A RISK AND THEREFORE I WOULD CONSIDER THIS PARTICULAR TREE UNSUITABLE FOR CONSUMPTION. IT’S A SAD REALITY OF THE MODERN WORLD AND JUST NOT WORTH THE RISK. MCHM IS IN USE IN THE REGION AND LOCALS KNOW ALL TOO WELL THAT BY THE TIME A SPILL IS REPORTED IT’S ALREADY TOO LATE TO PREVENT CONTAMINATION. )

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

Ring this bell for Facebook

Recently, I’ve been made aware that many of my posts on Facebook are being buried in the feed. So, if you don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website at the bottom of theWelcome Page

Tonight’s Feature Image is “The Big Elm At London West Virginia 12.27.18” and is available for purchase by usingthe Contact Form on my website. ( just click on the the bell below)

(Note, I do not share or sell contact information. EVER)

4X6 is $5.00

5X7 is $10.00

8X10 is $15.00

Some cropping may be necessary for certain sizes.

Ring this bell to order prints or schedule portraits

I’m also available for portraits by appointment. Use the Contact Form or message me on Facebook for details.