Forage Friday #105 Cuckoo Flower

Hello Friends! Tonight’s Feature Image was taken specifically for Forage Friday. All photos found on my website are my original work unless otherwise specified and are available for purchase by clicking the thumbnail and reaching out to me on the contact page.

Please remember that Forage Friday is presented as trivia and not to be mistaken for medical advice.

The rain settles out in my Appalachian Mountains and with the emergence of the sun I’m drawn out of the house for a bit of fresh air. I’ve given a strip of space around my yard back to nature and with the expectation of trimming back some trees that would endangere my house I let what wants to grow there be there. Occasionally something new to me pops up and get to learn all about it and observe it throughout its life cycle. That’s how I was introduced to the cuckoo flower. Cuckoo flower gets its common name because it appears at about the same time that the Cuckoo bird begins to make it’s distinctive call. Which struck me as odd because because the Cuckoo is a native of North America and the Cuckoo flower is native to Europe and Asia. But Cuckoo flower is also known as milk maids so perhaps it didn’t get to be called Cuckoo flower until it arrived here.

Cuckoo flower is a type of mustard and that puts it in the Brassicaceae family just like broccoli and cauliflower. It’s been here in North America long enough to have been naturalized and a common “weed” in yards and gardens. Like many so called weeds cuckoo flower actually comes with some benefits.

For the naturalist and wildlife lovers cuckoo flower attracts the orange tip butterflies which at this point I believe to be a European species but I could be wrong. I have noticed that they seem to attract insects of many types. There are actually three different insects on the flowers in the Featured Image. One looks like a flea beetle and I’m guessing that it’s the wings of a tacinid fly sticking out from behind one of the blooms. The third I haven’t identified. But they all seem to like the cuckoo flower. And with good reason. In spite of the bitter flavor cuckoo flower is rich in vitamin C and can be eaten raw or cooked. The young plants are said to have the mildest flavor and are compared to watercress. But because the flavor is pungent small portions added to other ingredients is recommended.

Cuckoo flower isn’t often mentioned in my herbal manuals but it has been used as a digestive aid. Something that I seldom point out is the timing of gathering medicinal herbs. For cuckoo flower the medicinal values are highest when the plant have flowers. There are mentions that the plants are used internally for chronic skin problems and asthma.

There’s not really much more on cuckoo flower. I’m presuming the short season and strong flavor keeps it from being popular and is therefore left for the butterflies. But if times were tough and we needed nutrients it is a resource that’s available early when regular garden plants are just getting started.

Good night friends and be blessed throughout your days.

Announcement 2.0

For those who have been following me on Facebook and know of the struggle content providers have to get circulation from big tech I’ve been recommending for people to adopt MeWe as a social media platform. One of the problems I’ve run into on MeWe is that people don’t know how to navigate the platform. So to help with that I’ve created a permanent page on my website as a basic Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe I’ve tried to anticipate all basic questions there and You can bookmark the page to have as a reference and if you have any questions or suggestions don’t hesitate to contact me. I do still have a day job and I help admin several pages on both platforms so replies might be a little slow but I will answer you.

We also have the Lloyd’s Lens Photography Discussion Group on MeWe that is set up as a fully functional community. There you’ll not only be able to see and connect with me but you can also make your own posts and interact with each other.

I want you to join my group on MeWe: https://mewe.com/join/lloydslensphotographydiscussiongroup

Click the link below to jump to the Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe.https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/guide-to-mewe/embed/#?secret=GJGnIQEVHc

Hey Friends! Just a quick reminder that Lloyds Lens Photography is available for portraits!

To book me simply reach out using the Contact Page and we’ll set a date. If you’re within a 50 mile radius of Summersville West Virginia all travel fees are waived.

If you’re enjoying my blog and don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website.

WELCOME TO LLOYD’S LENS PHOTOGRAPHY

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/embed/#?secret=ZBipPVJdZw

Click here to visithttps://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Have you checked out the Zazzle Store?

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply use the contact form on my websiteand tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you tohttps://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251Lastly, all of the photos and writings are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographerThank you again for your support of my page!♥️

Forage Friday #104 Garlic Mustard.

Hello Friends! Tonight’s Feature Image was taken specifically for Forage Friday. All photos found on my website are my original work unless otherwise specified and are available for purchase by clicking the thumbnail and reaching out to me on the contact page.

Please remember that Forage Friday is presented as trivia and not to be mistaken for medical advice.

A warm golden glow filters through the budding forest as I carefully positioned myself on the thin berm of the road. I’m trying to find the best angle for photographing the Honeybees as they lovingly work the wild geraniums when I become slightly unbalanced. When I widen my stance for stability I accidentally crush a plant beneath my foot and the strong oder of garlic fills the àir. Then I noticed that I’m standing in a mixed blessing. I’m surrounded by garlic mustard.

I choose the phrase “mixed blessing” carefully. Garlic Mustard is one of a number plants brought to the New Word on purpose by colonists. We have to remember that in those days there really wasn’t a concept of invasive species. They only saw this plant as a strong herb with great value as food and medicine. It’s native to Europe and a faithful garden companion. It hardly ever fails to grow and therefore was worthy of being counted on. All parts of the plant are edible and studies have shown that it’s got a very high nutritional density. One of the presenters I listened to while researching this article commented that it’s the most nutritional wild plant they’ve ever studied. It can be eaten raw or cooked. The flavor is of course garlicky and depending on soil quality can be slightly bitter. My instincts are that when it’s bitter it’s probably got more medicinal values that we’ll look at later.

Garlic mustard outperforms garden greens like spinach and Swiss chard in fiber, vitamin A, B-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin C, calcium, iron, zinc, Manganese, copper, and omega 3 fatty acids.

Genetic studies indicate that the garlic mustard found in my part of the Appalachian Mountains is descendant from varieties found in the British Islands.

You’ll find a myriad of dishes online that have garlic mustard as a basic ingredient. The most popular seems to be pesto. The basic pesto calls for finely chopped garlic mustard leaves, pine nuts ( sometimes English Walnut) one garlic clove, lemon juice, olive oil and sugar. Because there’s so many recipes out there I recommend pulling a few up and getting the specific proportions and variations to find one that suits you.

Other foods that are suggested for including wildcrafted garlic mustard are mashed potatoes, carrots, stews, quinoa, salad and vinaigrette salad dressing.

The traditional medical uses include, anti asthma, antiseptic, expelling worms, used to promote healthy sweating, treat bronchitis, as a poultice for ulcers and to alleviate bites and stings of insects.

But if all the benefits of garlic mustard aren’t enough for you go out and pull a few garlic mustard plants from your favorite trail let me take a moment to explain why garlic mustard is a bad thing.

In previous articles I’ve mentioned the relationship between symbiotic soil fungi and the health of the forest. Sadly, garlic mustard actively kills not only the symbiotic fungus but the herbs that it’s bonded to and even the trees. It’s one of those plants that exudes a suppressive chemical through its roots and native North American species have no defense against it. One of the herbs that are killed by this is our native trilliums. But the loss of the symbiotic fungus is what concerns me the most. The fungus is the communication network between all plants in the forest. It’s literally like the internet just like was portrayed in the movie Avatar. Very old trees act as data nodes storing environmental information in the form of chemicals stored in the wood. Even old stumps that seem to have been long dead are tapped by the fungus to extract the chemical sequence and teach the younger trees and herbs how to deal with changes in the environment. For a basic explanation here’s a quick video that gives a concise overview.

When garlic mustard breaks this connection it actually harms the forest in the whole surrounding area. And a garlic mustard infestation can last for thirty years before the cycle ends naturally. The recovery of the fungus and connection to old growth forest is bound to take at least as long after the garlic mustard is gone.

Image Titled “West Virginia White 42820”. Clicking the image takes you to the original article I published on April 28th 2020.

Pictured above is West Virginia’s own rare butterfly, the West Virginia White. This little butterfly has had a rough time since industrialization. Heavy logging in the early 20th century had nearly destroyed all of its habit and was once predicted to be the first Eastern species to go extinct. It’s natural native host plant is the native mustards such as Collards. The butterfly will lay its eggs and when they hatch the Caterpillar feeds on the collards. Until garlic mustard came along. Whatever chemical signal that the West Virginia White Butterfly uses to find collards is stronger in the garlic mustard. But it’s a trap. Garlic mustard also produces a substance that’s toxic to the West Virginia White Butterfly and is 100% fatal to the caterpillars. Removal of garlic mustard from your property is essential for the survival of the West Virginia White.

So to sum it all up, foraging on garlic mustard provides you with a plant that’s still grown in some Asian and European gardens, has a higher nutritional value than a lot of domestic greens, helps fight deforestation and increases the health of the environment and helps preserve the West Virginia White Butterfly.

One last thought. Garlic Mustard is a biannual and most removal programs recommended allowing the first year plants to grow and harvesting in the second year after the flowers bloom but before the seeds mature. This should prevent the next generation and in just a few short years the cycle is broken.

A closer look at the cross shaped garlic mustard flowers and the deeply veined leaves.

That’s it for this week’s Forage Friday. Good night friends and be blessed throughout your days.

Announcement 2.0

For those who have been following me on Facebook and know of the struggle content providers have to get circulation from big tech I’ve been recommending for people to adopt MeWe as a social media platform. One of the problems I’ve run into on MeWe is that people don’t know how to navigate the platform. So to help with that I’ve created a permanent page on my website as a basic Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe I’ve tried to anticipate all basic questions there and You can bookmark the page to have as a reference and if you have any questions or suggestions don’t hesitate to contact me. I do still have a day job and I help admin several pages on both platforms so replies might be a little slow but I will answer you.

We also have the Lloyd’s Lens Photography Discussion Group on MeWe that is set up as a fully functional community. There you’ll not only be able to see and connect with me but you can also make your own posts and interact with each other.

I want you to join my group on MeWe: https://mewe.com/join/lloydslensphotographydiscussiongroup

Click the link below to jump to the Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe.https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/guide-to-mewe/embed/#?secret=GJGnIQEVHc

Hey Friends! Just a quick reminder that Lloyds Lens Photography is available for portraits!

To book me simply reach out using the Contact Page and we’ll set a date. If you’re within a 50 mile radius of Summersville West Virginia all travel fees are waived.

If you’re enjoying my blog and don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website.

WELCOME TO LLOYD’S LENS PHOTOGRAPHY

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/embed/#?secret=ZBipPVJdZw

Click here to visithttps://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Have you checked out the Zazzle Store?

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply use the contact form on my websiteand tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you tohttps://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251Lastly, all of the photos and writings are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographerThank you again for your support of my page!♥️

Forage Friday #103 Apple Blossom

Hello Friends! Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “Apple Blossoms On Salmon Run Road 41321” and is available for purchase by clicking on the thumbnail and reaching out to me on the contact page.

Please remember that Forage Friday is presented as trivia and not to be mistaken for medical advice.

As the Spring sun breathes life into the landscape an ancient symbol of the changing season is found on the shore of the lake bed. The only Apples native to North America is the crab apple. The first European Apple orchard in the United States was planted by Reverend William Blaxton in Boston in 1625. And not to far from my home the Golden Delicious Apple was developed in Clay County West Virginia in 1914. According to Italian scientists who study plant genetics our Golden Delicious Apple gas the largest number of genomes they have studied so far. As the trees have been prolifically spread by humans and animals some form of apples can often be found along old pastures and homesteads or as the case with the one in our Feature Image, they are planted as edible landscaping. And while we typically think of apples as a Fall food source the blossom is also a food source that’s available in spring.

During the Victorian Age including flowers in the meal as more than a table setting or garnish for the plate was pretty common and is still pretty common in some countries today.

Image Titled “Apple Blossoms On Salmon Run Road 41321b” and is available for purchase by clicking the thumbnail and reaching out to me on the contact page.

Now there’s a word of caution, according to the internet Apple Blossoms may carry the precursors of cyanide and apple seeds are considered to be poison. However, I’m one of those weird people who routinely consumes an entire apple seeds and all. To date I have not died or suffered any ill effects from the seeds. But I also don’t consume a large quantity of seeds. Just a few that are in the apple. So with that in mind I’ll suggest that it’s probably not a great idea to sit down and eat Apple Blossoms is if they were a bag of chips. Or as Green Dean put it, “A Few is tasty. Too many is a tumy ache. And a lot is a trip to the hospital. ”

Image Titled “Apple Blossoms & Crab Spider 41321” and is available for purchase by clicking the thumbnail and reaching out to me on the contact page.

Generally speaking apple blossoms are rich in antioxidants. When included in a tea blend apple blossoms are said to promote good digestion and clear the complexion as well as help with easing stress. The flavor goes well with roses, elderflower and jasmine. And of course they can also be used to make a tincture.

Spring is also a great time to harvest a few apple leaves while they’re still young and tender. They also can be dried or cured to produce a tea. The leaves are astringent and antimicrobial.

One online blend recommends combining apple leaves with bramble leaves, strawberry leaves and a half of a cinnamon stick.

That’s it for tonight friends, good night and be blessed throughout your days!

Announcement 2.0

For those who have been following me on Facebook and know of the struggle content providers have to get circulation from big tech I’ve been recommending for people to adopt MeWe as a social media platform. One of the problems I’ve run into on MeWe is that people don’t know how to navigate the platform. So to help with that I’ve created a permanent page on my website as a basic Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe I’ve tried to anticipate all basic questions there and You can bookmark the page to have as a reference and if you have any questions or suggestions don’t hesitate to contact me. I do still have a day job and I help admin several pages on both platforms so replies might be a little slow but I will answer you.

We also have the Lloyd’s Lens Photography Discussion Group on MeWe that is set up as a fully functional community. There you’ll not only be able to see and connect with me but you can also make your own posts and interact with each other.

I want you to join my group on MeWe: https://mewe.com/join/lloydslensphotographydiscussiongroup

Click the link below to jump to the Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/guide-to-mewe/

Hey Friends! Just a quick reminder that Lloyds Lens Photography is available for portraits!

To book me simply reach out using the Contact Page and we’ll set a date. If you’re within a 50 mile radius of Summersville West Virginia all travel fees are waived.

If you’re enjoying my blog and don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Have you checked out the Zazzle Store?

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply use the contact form on my websiteand tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you tohttps://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251

Lastly, all of the photos and writings are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographer

Thank you again for your support of my page!

Forage Friday #102 Serviceberry

Hello Friends! Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “Serviceberry In Bloom 40621a” and is available for purchase by clicking the thumbnail and reaching out to me on the contact page.

Please remember that Forage Friday is presented as trivia and not to be mistaken for medical advice.

One of the true blessings of the Appalachian Spring is of course the opening of the serviceberry bloom. The little frilly looking flowers with a set of tell-tale brown scales at the base just seem to suddenly erupt from the forest edges. They’re usually a few weeks ahead of the dogwoods but are often mistaken for some exotic form of dogwoods by the casual observer.

My grandfather would sometimes recall one of his favorite treats from his childhood during the Great Depression as being serviceberry pie. I can’t seem to recall the exact description He gave but I could tell from the look in his eyes that he was watching himself as child climbing into the trees to gather the berries. And I’ve heard similar stories from others of that generation. So much so that I don’t really understand why a cottage industry of authentic Appalachian serviceberry baked goods wasn’t a thing.

Serviceberry was apparently a favorite among Native Americans as well. It was often included in pemmican which, for those who may not know, is a mixture of meat, fat and fruit that lasted a very long time under primitive conditions.

Aside from pies the fruits can be used to make jam, pastries and as a general snack. The flavor is semisweet and often described as having a mild apple taste. The modern American diet has become so sugary that a lot of old time fruits and sweets don’t seem to trigger the brain’s pleasure centers like they used to. However I can assure you from personal experience that after you cut out heavy sweets for a couple of months those modern candies are almost intolerable and something like serviceberry becomes just right. It’s also a different experience because at that point you’re able to detect subtle nuances in the flavor that was overridden by the sugar before. I see it as being like noticing a masterpiece of art that you couldn’t appreciate before.

The nutritional facts are as follows:

Potassium – 133.3 grams

Vitamin A – 1.3% RDI

Vitamin C – 26.7% RDI

Calcium- 1.3% RDI

Folate – 2.7 RDI

Iron – 2.7 RDI

Magnesium-2.7 RDI

Phosphorus – 2.7 RDI

In reviewing a government study on the nutritional value of serviceberry I noticed that it seems to high in polyphenols which is the same classification of substances that is credited with giving chaga and turkey tail mushrooms some of their medicinal values. While the study didn’t cite any particulars on that they did list some traditional Native American medical uses.

It’s not surprising that Native Americans used the fruit juice as a laxative but what struck me was that it was used as eye and ear drops. The boiled bark of serviceberry was a handy disinfectant for the natives and boiling the roots made a treatment to prevent miscarriages after injuries. A tea made from the twigs was given to women after childbirth and a tonic from the bark was believed to help expel the placenta.

Native Americans also found the wood itself to be useful. The smaller branches and twigs were good for weaving. While thicker pieces made good arrows, canes, canoe frames and digging sticks. To be used as a digging stick in particular the wood had to be tough and hard. They even used it to make pipe bowls.

That’s it for tonight’s Forage Friday.

Good night friends and be blessed throughout your days.

Announcement 2.0

For those who have been following me on Facebook and know of the struggle content providers have to get circulation from big tech I’ve been recommending for people to adopt MeWe as a social media platform. One of the problems I’ve run into on MeWe is that people don’t know how to navigate the platform. So to help with that I’ve created a permanent page on my website as a basic Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe I’ve tried to anticipate all basic questions there and You can bookmark the page to have as a reference and if you have any questions or suggestions don’t hesitate to contact me. I do still have a day job and I help admin several pages on both platforms so replies might be a little slow but I will answer you.

We also have the Lloyd’s Lens Photography Discussion Group on MeWe that is set up as a fully functional community. There you’ll not only be able to see and connect with me but you can also make your own posts and interact with each other.

I want you to join my group on MeWe: https://mewe.com/join/lloydslensphotographydiscussiongroup

Click the link below to jump to the Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/guide-to-mewe/

Hey Friends! Just a quick reminder that Lloyds Lens Photography is available for portraits!

To book me simply reach out using the Contact Page and we’ll set a date. If you’re within a 50 mile radius of Summersville West Virginia all travel fees are waived.

If you’re enjoying my blog and don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Have you checked out the Zazzle Store?

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply use the contact form on my websiteand tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you tohttps://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251

Lastly, all of the photos and writings are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographer

Thank you again for your support of my page!

Forage Friday #101 Hazelnut

Hello Friends! Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “Hazelnut Catkins 32321a”

Please remember that Forage Friday is presented as trivia and not to be mistaken for medical advice.

The idea of Forage Friday for me was part of a challenge to at least 100 useful plants growing near my home and learn as much as I can about them. Now this is Forage Friday post number 101 but since over the past couple of years I’ve missed a post here and there we haven’t quite reached 100 plants. With that said, I plan to continue the series past 100. Forage Friday may take different forms here and there when something isn’t in season or just can’t be located but my goal is to learn how to identify and use as much from nature as possible. We’ll probably even look at meat sometime in the future. But for now, let’s get onto #ForageFriday number 101, Hazelnut.

If you’re like me, when you think of Hazelnut your first thoughts are about the delicious, thin shelled nuts that turn up in the produce aisle at Christmas. But, Hazelnut has something to offer in early Spring too. Hazelnut Catkins. If you’ve never eaten catkins before you might have to adjust your expectations a little. I think that the best description I’ve seen is “mildly bitter with the texture of sawdust”. It makes you wonder why people would eat them but going by the time of year when they’re available I’d say they were a bit of an emergency food used to stretch out thinning supplies. And since they are a pollen producing structure it’s a safe bet that they’re protein rich. The only catkins I’ve personally sampled were birch and the experience wasn’t really all that great. However, that was raw and fresh from the twigs. One online source staid that dropping them into boiling water makes them release all their pollen at once and when mixed with honey it improves the flavor quite a bit. Several trees in Appalachia have catkins and are out this time of year. The hazelnut is kind enough to give us an easy to spot clue as to its identity. If you look closely at the Featured image you’ll see tiny little pinkish red flowers that are just out of focus. ( there’s a wild rose with red buds and leaves as well). The female flowers on hazelnut are born on little cones that are tipped with these flowers. They are entirely pollinated by the wind so they don’t need large flowers to attract insects. They also need different varieties present to ensure pollination. Even though a single tree has both male and female flowers they cannot self pollinate.

The catkins are said to have some medicinal values. They are astringent so a strong tea would most likely be good for the skin as a wash. They promote healthy sweating and thus help flush out toxins. They are said to reduce fever as well as having been used to sooth toothache.

Of course the nut is still what they’re famous for. Like all nuts hazelnut is rich in protein and oil. Here’s the breakdown for 1 ounce of hazelnuts.

176 calories

17 grams of fat

4.2 grams of protein

4.7 carbohydrates

2.7 grams of fiber

21% of a days worth of vitamin E

12% of your Thiamine and Magnesium

24% of your daily copper intake

And 81% of the Manganese you need in a day.

Hazelnuts are known to have phytic acid which is believed to inhibit the absorption of Zinc and iron so like with everything else moderation is important.

The hazelnut is also rich in polyphenols. According to Government Statistics they are the richest of the tree nuts in these compounds that may help prevent things like heart disease and cancer.

Hazelnut milk sounds like an awesome idea for those who like cream in their coffee. There’s plenty of online recipes but the basics are the same for any nut milk.

Place a small amount of nuts in a bowl with water ( filtered or distilled ). Allow to soak overnight and blend. Then strain and add a little vanilla.

While doing my online research I stumbled across this lady who was making a German Hazelnut Cake! The hazelnuts provide the flour.

Recently, almonds have come under a little fire because they’re farmed in areas where water is a bit more of a premium resource. I’ve stated privately that in my area you can almost poke a hole in the ground anywhere and hit water and we have strip mines that once they’re rehabilitated are begging for a purpose. Wouldn’t it be a great idea to transform a piece of barren land into a renewable resource and source of food as well as economic growth? Assuming that the land is ready for planting hazelnuts on the average produce the first marketable crop within 5 years as opposed to 20 or 30 years for timber. If you can inoculate the grounds with the right symbiotic fungus that produce edible mushrooms your harvest could be sooner and self-sustaining.

Image Titled “Hazelnut Catkins 32321b”.

Lastly, I’d be doing the topic of hazelnut an injustice if I didn’t at least touch on coppicing. Hazelnut is one of those trees that loves to be cut. The practice of coppicing hazelnut has been around since ancient times. When done right it actually extends the life of the tree and increases it’s productivity. The parts that regrow are generally referred to as “rods”. The grow back straighter and stronger. The rods were used for everything from walking sticks to woven wall panels. Walls were made by weaving a kind of oversized wicker panel and coated with cob ( a mixture of straw and clay ) similar to some of the early homes in Appalachia. The hazelnut rods also provided flat bows and arrows as well firewood.

Coppicing was also used to create living fences in western Europe. As I understand it each village even had its own style and patterns to the fence. The basic technique was to only partially cut the hazelnut tree and the weave the living stock into the hedge row. Because the tree was still alive it would continue to grow and send out branches that strengthened the wall.

That’s about it for tonight friends. Good night and be blessed throughout your days.

Announcement 2.0

For those who have been following me on Facebook and know of the struggle content providers have to get circulation from big tech I’ve been recommending for people to adopt MeWe as a social media platform. One of the problems I’ve run into on MeWe is that people don’t know how to navigate the platform. So to help with that I’ve created a permanent page on my website as a basic Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe I’ve tried to anticipate all basic questions there and You can bookmark the page to have as a reference and if you have any questions or suggestions don’t hesitate to contact me. I do still have a day job and I help admin several pages on both platforms so replies might be a little slow but I will answer you.

We also have the Lloyd’s Lens Photography Discussion Group on MeWe that is set up as a fully functional community. There you’ll not only be able to see and connect with me but you can also make your own posts and interact with each other.

I want you to join my group on MeWe: https://mewe.com/join/lloydslensphotographydiscussiongroup

Click the link below to jump to the Basic Beginner’s Guide To MeWe.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/guide-to-mewe/

Hey Friends! Just a quick reminder that Lloyds Lens Photography is available for portraits!

To book me simply reach out using the Contact Page and we’ll set a date. If you’re within a 50 mile radius of Summersville West Virginia all travel fees are waived.

If you’re enjoying my blog and don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Have you checked out the Zazzle Store?

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply use the contact form on my websiteand tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you tohttps://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251

Lastly, all of the photos and writings are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographer

Thank you again for your support of my page!