Thoughts On Earth Day 2020

Hello Friends! Tonight’s feature image is titled “Natural Love 4220” and is available for purchase by the instructions at the bottom of the article.

Typically, I don’t really make a big deal out of Earth Day. The biggest reason for that is that like everything else in culture today the objective gets lost in political opinions and debates that seem to be more about who is right rather than what is right. It’s a difficult topic for me to cover and maintain a focus on the positive. But there are a few things that everyone seems to agree on. The biggest issues of the day is all the plastic in our waterways. We see the images on T.V. and the internet of plastic in the ocean and on the beaches but at least some of it came from the streams and rivers of our inland. Even Little Elk Creek that runs through my yard is laden with the debris of so called civilization. The truth is that it’s human nature to simply discard waste. Archaeologists have built careers on the study of Midden Mounds. The main thing that has changed over several thousand years is that our debris and artifacts have become incapable of being recycled by nature. Prior to 1907 most things were either made from wood, ceramics and glass or metal. If anyone discarded these items in the wilderness natural processes dealt with them. Wood of course would rot while the other materials had little more impact than stone. Steel rusted and the resulting iron oxide would be used by nature even if it took a long time. When I was a kid we’d pick up the glass bottles and turn them in for a cash reward. It was usually enough for bottle of Coke and a Hershey bar. Glass was the currency of children in those days. I have the recollection of the pitch for plastic of glass. We were told that it would be easier to recycle plastic because it required less energy to melt it down and reform it into a new product. But soon the deposit was discontinued and picking up bottles out of ditches had no value. We actually have to pay people to haul away the very same items that we once got paid to pick up ourselves. 3D printing might change that. A quick Google search turned up a few articles on a class of 3D printers that consume shredded plastic and turns it into new useable items.

But you don’t need to go high tech. As an example here’s a Howcast video about using a hot iron along with needle and thread to convert disposable plastic bags into a resizable tote.

Another example is this guy who used a toaster oven and recycled plastic to create a woodworking mallet.

Once you get the concept down you’re only limited by your imagination. I have a close friend who’s scrap built starship models are second to none.

But it’s not just the litter in our waterways. There’s enough things like controlling erosion, planting forests and even urban farming that would bring us back to a more natural way of life. For every challenge there’s going to be multiple ways to resolve it on a personal level. We just need to look at the options and set a course. If we wait for someone else to fix it then by default we’ll be the last to benefit from the solutions offered.

Image Titled “Natural Love 4220”.

My last thought on Earth Day 2020 is that I don’t want to focus on the problem as much as I do the solutions and specifically a solution that you can implement all on your own. Even if it’s just bagging up the trash in a park and sending it to a landfill you’re getting it of the wilderness and that’s a good thing.

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A Beautiful Killer

Hello friends! Tonight’s feature image is titled Beauty Kills” and is available for purchase by following the instructions at the bottom of the article.

The last days of summer slipped into the past so quickly. One day I was excited to see the green buds forming on bare branches and the next thing I knew the leaves were dropping on my lawn. It was only a few weeks ago that I spotted the tall stalks and bright purple flower spikes of purple loosestrife. The beauty of the flowers against the deep blue sky was soothing indeed. After such a fast paced day I needed a few moments to enjoy the empty space near the railroad. The lore associated with loosestrife is that it’s presence bring peace. I have to admit that I did feel more at ease while I took the picture. The problem is that loosestrife is an invasive species that’s able to crowed out even cattail. What’s more is that it doesn’t really have food value for North American wildlife and cattail does. That’s how it got the nickname of “The Beautiful Killer”. In spite of the wonderful colors and texture that the loosestrife provides it pushes out the native food species.

I believe that there’s a life lesson here. Loosestrife was brought to the New World as an ornamental plant. And there’s no denying that it is beautiful. But it has no natural enemies in North America and it speeads unchallenged outside of the garden. All of this happened in the Victorian Era when nobody would have thought about the consequences. The lesson of course is that just because something is beautiful doesn’t mean that it should be desired.

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Did you know that I also do portraits by appointment? If you’re interested in a portrait session either message me on Facebook or Use the Contact form. The YouTube link below takes you one of my slideshows.

https://youtu.be/FDcrY6w8oY8

Have you checked out the Zazzle Store?

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply message me on Facebook oruse the contact form on my websiteand tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you tohttps://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251

Lastly, all of the photos and writings are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographer.

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The Benefits Of Being Stumped

Hello Friends! Tonight’s feature image is titled “Stumped “and is available for purchase by following the instructions at the bottom of the page.

Several days ago I stopped by Kanawha Falls for a quick photo op and was blessed with several great shots. The park is prone to flooding and as the water recedes it always deposits a fresh supply of driftwood. Including apparently perfectly cut stumps that just right for a makeshift seat. With the water just right and the sunshine filling the valley it was time to get stumped. Now you might have the impression that being stumped is a negative thing. Well, the average use of the phrase does usually commentate a state of confusion with no hope of a solution. That’s not the case here. No, being stumped is good thing. Especially in such a beautiful place. I only had a few minutes but the stump was so inviting that I couldn’t pass up having a seat and just enjoying the sun and the water. In fact I sat there with no agendas so long that thoughts began to happen. I thought about how nice it was to be out of the office on a pretty day. I thought about some upcoming plans and how I would get stuff done. And I thought about life in general. The result of all that quiet time and positive thought had me feeling very blessed. And that blessed feeling carried through into that peaceful confidence that always improves the day. It’s amazing what a little quiet time can do for you and pulling up a stump along the Kanawha River and just enjoying the sun is a great way to get it.

Before I close I want to give a HUGE shout out to the volunteers of the Make It Shine group on Facebook. When the river runs high it also picks up a lot of trash and litter. I was actually pretty heartbroken a few weeks ago when I saw how much plastic was deposited in the park over the winter. So many times when we make a statement about caring for the environment it a story about the tragedy of trash in the wrong place. But tonight I have a positive story to share about how the volunteers cleaned up one of my favorite places to stop and catch a moment of peace. To the 38 or so people who took it upon themselves to deal with huge mess I want to say thank you very much and I expect to join you on the next effort. Below is a collage of the before and after photos. I didn’t really get a lot of before photos but after photos will give you an idea of scale.

If you appreciate their efforts and are local please let them know!

https://www.facebook.com/events/441502229918466/?ti=cl

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook

If you would like to Follow me on Facebook the web address is

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If you’re enjoying my blog and don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website.

https://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Click the web to go tohttps://lloydslensphotographyllc.com/

Did you know that I also do portraits by appointment? If you’re interested in a portrait session either message me onFacebook or use the contact form

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Have you checked out the Zazzle Store?

I’m now using Zazzle to fulfil orders. What this means for you is a secure way to place an order, discount codes & a broader product selection! Simply message me on Facebook oruse the contact form on my websiteand tell me which image you want and I’ll reply with a direct link to where you can place the order.

Clicking on the photo takes you tohttps://www.zazzle.com/lloydslensphotos?rf=238248269630914251

Lastly, all of the photos and writings are my original work unless otherwise specified and are not to be copied or reproduced without expressed written permission from the photographer.

Thank you again for your support of my page! 😊

Winter And Wild Teas

In the natural world winter is a time for rest. The animals tend to stay in their dens. The hardwood trees are in a deep sleep as are the bears. Even the deer find a nice place in the deep woods where they can shelter from the cold. The days are still short and the cold nights are long. Just perfect for deep rest.

The giant elm tree in tonight’s feature image is just as beautiful in the winter as it is with its leaves on in the warmer months. One of the special treats of the colder months when I was a kid was bark teas. I’d be careful about where I harvested the bark (see note below) but elm actually has a nice spicy flavor. Several years ago I was able to try it for the first time. Traditionally it’s used for sore throats and colds ( I’m not a doctor or a certified anything so this is historical statement and not medical advice) due to the gelatinous fiber it yields. The flavor is similar to the Balsam Poplar that grows in higher elevations. In just a few months the buds will begin to swell and they make a good tea as well. In the old days, the Basswood (Linden or Lyme in Europe) buds were a source of winter food for my ancestors. Winter hikes in my teens always included stopping by a grove of black birch for a handful of wintergreen flavored twigs to nibble on. Sassafras was also a wonderful bark tea with an aroma that filled the house. There’s also the Carolina Spicebush who’s twigs provide a very lemon like flavor and the red berries of the stag horn sumac which has to be filtered well but gives us a pink lemonade in winter.

Perhaps that’s why I like this big old elm tree so much. It’s not only because it’s awesome to look at but it reminds me of all the cool stuff that the Appalachian forests provide even in winter.

(NOTE: WHILE THE TREES AND FOOD USES MENTIONED IN TONIGHT’S POST WERE TRADITIONALLY USED IN APPALACHIA THERE ARE HAZARDS AND FOOD ALLERGIES TO CONSIDER. FOR EXAMPLE, THE ELM IN TONIGHT’S POST IS GROWING NEAR A PLACE WHERE HAZARDOUS SOIL CONTAMINATION IS A RISK AND THEREFORE I WOULD CONSIDER THIS PARTICULAR TREE UNSUITABLE FOR CONSUMPTION. IT’S A SAD REALITY OF THE MODERN WORLD AND JUST NOT WORTH THE RISK. MCHM IS IN USE IN THE REGION AND LOCALS KNOW ALL TOO WELL THAT BY THE TIME A SPILL IS REPORTED IT’S ALREADY TOO LATE TO PREVENT CONTAMINATION. )

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Tonight’s Feature Image is “The Big Elm At London West Virginia 12.27.18” and is available for purchase by usingthe Contact Form on my website. ( just click on the the bell below)

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The Little Dragons

I have to admit that I never met a lizard that I didn’t like. Of course that might all change if I ever run into a Gila monster or a Komodo Dragon. Here in the Appalachian Mountains they don’t get much larger than this little guy in tonight’s feature image. The Five Lined Skink. The largest one I’ve seen was one about six inches long but in the eyes of a little kid with a vivid imagination it was a living dinosaur! I was never able to catch one but I always wanted to make a pet out of one so I could teach him to play Godzilla with my toy soldiers. In those days home movies were still shot on film but I had visions of setting up the scene shooting my own monster movie. It was during this endeavor that I learned about the trick tail. I was hunting for a big one that I had seen out by the barn. I was cautiously lifting up old wood an pieces of bark with a stick in case of a snake when I found him. My hands moved like lightning and I caught him! However the lizard had a surprise in store for me and the blue tail broke off in my hand. I looked down and saw the empty tail wiggling in my hand and started crying because I had broken my lizard. My kind and loving grandfather explained that it lets go of its tail on purpose and that the tail grows back. (Of course as a child I thought it grow back instantly like magic). At one point there was one with a forked tail living close to the house. It’s tail had not completely detached and the new one grew in next to the old one.

As an adult I smile and even speak to the little lizards on my property. I try to save some space for them on and around my property and in return they help keep the insect population in check. It seems that I got my pet lizards by simply leaving them alone and letting them do their thing.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page. If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. You’re also invited to follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook. If you don’t want to miss a post then you can sign up for email alerts on my website at the bottom of the Welcome Page.

Tonight’s Feature Image is titled “Guardian On The Bridge” because he lived on the wooden foot bridge of my former home. Prints are available for purchase by contacting me on Facebook or by using the Contact Form on my website.

4X6- $5.00

5X7- $10.00

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Some cropping may be necessary for certain sizes. I am available for portrait sessions by appointment. Just use Facebook or Contact Form to inquire about the rates.

The Zebra Swallowtail Butterfly

Gently gliding on the warm breeze she sails through my field of vision and softly lights on the sweet clover. She is something special. Her distinct stripes and long “tail” identify her as the Zebra Swallowtail butterfly. While she feeds on the nectar of flowers her young feed exclusively on the pawpaw tree. Once a favored fruit in the Appalachian Mountains the pawpaw (AKA pond Apple or custard apple ) is almost found only in the wild. Because the fruit has almost no shelf life commercial growers found no use for it. As a result it was not cultivated and is not nearly as abundant as it was even just fifty years ago. Because the the tree is so important to the butterfly their numbers have also declined. But on the old homesteads found on edge of civilization the pawpaw still grows and even thrives in a few places and so does the Zebra Swallowtail butterfly. If you see one during the breeding season then you can be sure that a pawpaw patch is nearby. If you’re an adventurous connoisseur of natural foods or vantage crops then it’s worth trying to find the pawpaw in season and give it a try.

Hello Friends and thank you for your support of my page! If you have enjoyed the photos or the writings please let me know by commenting and sharing my work on your social media. I also want to invite you to Follow Lloyds Lens Photography on Facebook.

Prints of the Feature Image are available for purchase by contacting me either through Facebook or via the Contact Form on my website. Simply mention the title of the post and let me know what size print that you would like.

Chasing Eagles Part 2

I just wanted give you a quick update on my quest for the eagles of the Kanawha River. This image was taken a couple of weeks ago near the Glen Ferris Inn in West Virginia. The bird was spotted over Kanawha Falls. I was out with my camera on the way home from my day job. I decided that I had time for a few quick shots of falls and kayaks when flash of white caught my attention. The largest lens I had with me was my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ30. Knowing that the local eagles are dark in color and only the head is white I was fairly certain that it wasn’t an eagle but this was still a big bird and it was moving fast. Fighting to keep my hands from trembling with excitement I engaged the burst mode. This bird is really fast! I kinda felt like an old west gun fighter as I tried desperately to keep him in frame and in focus. (This is not a time for manual mode) The whole encounter was only about 30 seconds as this bird’s aerobatic maneuvers kept me shifting focus out of pure reflex! First he skimmed the water towards the falls only pulling up at the last second. I lost sight of him as he banked in front of the trees and disappeared behind the inn. I started to scan the falls with my camera hoping that he would come back for a second run over the falls. That didn’t happen. Instead he pops up from behind the inn directly overhead of me. I raised my camera one more time bending over backwards and trying to focus. I almost fell over backwards. I spun around while zooming in and out and praying for that little beep from the camera body to let me know that I have a lock on the focus. Finally I get the beep and green square in the viewfinder just as the raptor performs a figure 8 maneuver that would leave any jet fighter in pieces on the ground. As the bird dives and skims parallel to the falls this time I managed to get one usable image. This was an osprey! Only about half the size of the eagle but still a very special bird. I now have a second goal to catch a high quality image the osprey.

On a side note, the existence of bald eagle has been challenged. As proof that both birds are in fact inhabiting the area I’m sharing this photo of a juvenile bald eagle. The image is too grainy to sell as art but it’s the best I could get without a longer lens. It’s only a matter of time before I can either stalk in close enough for a clear image or afford an equipment upgrade. Both eagle and the osprey were taken with the same camera.